Infrastructure Project

Before we can set off, we need to know what charging infrastructure will be available for us at each of our STOP Locations. The time required to charge will depend on the size of the Challenge boat batteries, the drain from the previous leg and the capacity of the charging sockets.

Electrical Wiring

Overview

As with Electric Vehicles there are basic, fast, super fast and rapid marine chargers already on the market and in some cases already installed. But to create a ‘daisy chain’ of charging solutions around the UK by the Summer of 2023, we will require an approach that is fit for purpose for each location. We will be aiming for an approx. 3 hour charging window at as many of the STOP Locations as possible so that we can achieve coverage of approx. 100-150nm in a day.

Our Infrastructure project will help STOP Locations consider how best to provide a charging facility, whether there is a case for a permanent install and if so, we will provide support through our knowledge sharing and Partners for that install.

 

A Charging Plan will be agreed with the STOP Locations during Summer 2022 and along with the projects preferred solution of a fast charging pillar there are other options to consider. For example this could be a shared EV/eBoat installation for workforce or club members which, if carefully sited on a harbour wall could service both future needs.

The Challenge team will also have available mobile charging units which gives the option of connecting to a dockside supply for a one off charge. This provides a cheaper solution for those not ready to invest in permanent infrastructure. 

If you are a local or regular visitor to one of our STOP locations, you might be able to support your Harbour Master in getting the required infrastructure installed so that the Round Britain eRIB Challenge can leave you a legacy for electric boat users.

STOP Locations

Stakeholders

This Infrastructure Project is supported by a number of Marine industry associations who represent local ports and harbours and whose members will be significantly impacted by the eMarine revolution.

 

Commitments from these associations in helping us to gather data on current electrical charging facilities, disseminating and sharing project information and opportunities, and supporting the drive for change is critical in moving this project forward.

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Charging Requirements

The boat will likely need two x 22kw AC charging sockets to be available, but anything better or faster is a bonus. The WORLDs first rapid DC 150kw charging unit was installed this year in Plymouth and is testament to the UK’s leading position in the eMarine revolution.

For our Challenge to be viable we don’t need a network of these rapid chargers – we simply need something that is fit for purpose. ​

  • Your local STOP Location may be able to install a harbour side charger suitable for both EV and eBoat charging. 

  • Provision from an existing supply could be supplemented with AC chargers to provide a more flexible offering of marine chargers at your Location.

  • It may be possible to install a charger for use by commercial operations vessels and vehicles so that these can be transitioned to electric power. ​

  • ​There may be RNLI or other local volunteers who drive electric cars and need a top up facility.

  • The local sailing club or local marine engineers may want to transition their safety boat or engineering offering to zero emission systems.

Bringing these local needs together and taking advantage of the Round Britain eRIB Direct Sales Offer could help these locations take the plunge and invest in a cleaner, greener future. ​​

Is electric boating really the future?

Yes! There are many inboard and outboard electric motors already on the market but sales are reliant on customers being able to charge them. To support the transition to eBoating the marine charging facilities need to be routinely available.  

'Battery technology definitely has a place in the future of eBoating, particularly for small leisure and small commercial craft.’

 Sarah Fear, Project Manager Marine eCharging Living Lab, Plymouth University

 

We are hoping to find solutions at our chosen locations for either a permanent eBoat charging install or at least a temporary one. Alternatively, charging on a 3-phase 32A 415V pontoon supply would likely require an overnight STOP.

 

We can’t afford to have many of these as we have around 39 legs and we need to be aiming for 2-3 legs a day.

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Help Us Achieve This

If you are a local or regular visitor to one of our STOP locations, you might be able to support your Harbour Master in getting the required infrastructure installed so that the Round Britain eRIB Challenge can leave you a legacy for electric boat users.